Cameras for Filming your Backcountry Hunts and Adventures!



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Saving weight is important when you’re going deep into the backcountry. Brad goes over his camera equipment and talks about how bridge cameras can be a great alternative for filming your hunting, fishing, and backcountry adventures. Including the Panasonic Lumix FZ200, Sony HX400V, Nikon P900

Some of our videos filmed with the Lumix FZ200:
Glimpse – Utah Elk Hunt:
Silver September – Alaska Silver Fishing –
Sage Pursuit – Antelope Hunt in Wyoming –

Check out the Sony HX400V ($399) here:
See the Nikon P900 ($549) Here:
Sony A7sii with $300 gift card:

Thanks for Watching! Leave a comment on what you’re using to film your outdoor activities!

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9 thoughts on “Cameras for Filming your Backcountry Hunts and Adventures!

  1. I'm not a hunter but I spend a lot of time in the back country. I began taking great photos with my cell phone and decided to get an actual purpose built camera to be able to record and share the beauty I experience out there with others. The problem was that I had no experience with photography aside from a cell phone camera and looking at the vast number of cameras out there had me really confused. I settled on a bridge camera, a Cannon PowerShot SX 420 IS as the reviews were good, the learning curve short and price was not prohibitive. I am happy with the bridge camera setup, but not this particular camera. It works great for still shots of stationary landscapes but is really frustrating because the auto-focus does everything on it's own and most of the time picks anything other than what I want it to focus on. If there are ducks in a pond the camera will select a tree branch to focus on instead of the ducks and there is no way to select the subject for yourself. A herd of pregnant cow Elk walked directly in front of me and out of view but because of this issue I was unable to get any useful footage which was a big disappointment. My cellphone has a touch screen and I touch where I want to focus and that's that, I've nearly tossed this camera away for that reason alone. It also will not track or focus on moving objects in video mode and many times I have wanted to pitch this thing in the bushes because it is basically useless for anything other than portraits or landscapes. I am looking to get another camera, and I will most likely select another bridge, but what I will look for is one that has a touch screen and more user control with less automation. This camera also does not take HD video which I find odd in this day and age and picture quality all around is much better with my Samsung Galaxy S6, The only benefit is the 42X optical zoom. I will be doing more research for my next purchase, that's how I came across this video. I'll likely not choose a Sony next time as they really hyped this camera up and it has fallen short on nearly every aspect. Thanks for the video.

  2. I have a Nikon D3400 which is still a great camera, my fear is taking in the mountains with me. What do you use for a camera case? Also, how many SD cards will you take with you on a typical hunt?

  3. Very Informative video! Thanks. I am thinking of trying a bridge camera like the FZ300 or one of the two that you mentioned (the P900 or the HX400V). All three of these have a smaller sensor as compared to say the FZ1000. Can you give me some idea of which one of these smaller-sensor cameras may be better in low light situations? Or will all of them suffer in the last minutes of legal shooting light? thanks for your help.

  4. I self film all my hunts and after trying different setups still old good camcorders work for me best. I tried DSLRs and they are good and give nice footage with shallow depth of field, but they are PITA if you are on your own with manual focus, big lens and poor stabilization. I am considering a high zoom bridge cam, but it would not be my first camera, I would still need a decent camcorder for majority of the work.
    Good video, thanks for sharing.

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